Surgical Procedures

Shoulder

  • How quickly can you get me shoulder surgery?

    Typically, we can get you surgery within 2-3 weeks from the time we receive your diagnostic package.  In certain cases, we can get a client surgery within 24 hours.  Call or e-mail us to get a accurate quote and timeline for your surgery.

  • Why might I need shoulder surgery?

    Your shoulder is the most flexible joint in your body. Think about it – while your knee and elbow move in only one direction, your remarkable shoulder can move in almost a full circle. But this great flexibility also poses a problem – it puts your shoulder at risk of being injured.

    People who are athletic (tennis and squash players, for example) are more likely to suffer from shoulder injuries. But regardless of activity, the risk of injury increases dramatically with age. As well, disease can play a role. Here is a list of the common reasons people seek shoulder surgery:

    -Recurrent dislocation
    -Rotator cuff tears
    -Recurrent tendonitis
    -Persistent bursitis
    -Frozen shoulder
    -Arthritis
    -Fractures

  • How do I get a proper diagnosis for my shoulder pain?

    Most commonly, doctors will recommend that you get an MRI or a CT-scan so they can get a clear and detailed picture of exactly what’s going on inside your shoulder. From time to time, however, they may suggest you have an arthroscopy. This is a minor surgery using a small device (sometimes as thin as a pencil) fitted with a camera. The camera allows the surgeon to “look” inside your shoulder and make a diagnosis. This surgery can sometimes be done on an out-patient basis, meaning you will not have to stay overnight in hospital.

  • I have serious shoulder pain - why do I have to wait so long for help?

    Bad as your pain is, your need for shoulder surgery will probably not be seen as “urgent” by the Canadian public health care system. Hospital bed shortages and limited operating room times across Canada mean that you can wait a long time before getting the help you need. This is where Timely Medical Alternatives can help expedite your case so you can get your diagnosis and or surgery without waiting.

  • What are the different surgical options for me?

    Some shoulder surgeries, such as some rotator cuff repairs, can be done by arthroscopy – the small camera described above. Other surgeries, such as shoulder replacements, will require “open” surgery, meaning a lengthier surgery and a larger incision. Fractures may require fixation with sutures, pins or wires. After the surgeon reviews your diagnostic imaging you will meet with the surgeon in person to discuss in detail exactly what your case requires.

  • How long will it take me to recover from shoulder surgery?

    Your recovery time from shoulder surgery will depend both on the type of surgery you had (arthroscopic or open) and on the nature of your injury. Generally, the more complex and longstanding the problem, the longer it will take you to recover. The recovery range for shoulder surgery varies greatly – anywhere from several weeks to six months or more. You can reduce your recovery time and improve your result by faithfully following the exercise program that your doctor or physiotherapist will recommend after your shoulder surgery is complete.

Knee

  • How quickly can you get me knee surgery?

    Typically, we can get you surgery within 2-3 weeks from the time we receive your diagnostic package.  In certain cases, we can get a client surgery within 24 hours.  Call or e-mail us to get a accurate quote and timeline for your surgery.

  • Why is my knee so sore and what can I do about it?

    Timely Medical

    If you’re suffering from knee pain, it probably won’t surprise you to learn that the knee handles more stress than almost any other joint in your body. This crucial joint must carry most of your body weight with every step. As well, it twists and bends so you can sit, stand, walk up stairs, get in and out of your car and maybe even play golf, tennis or squash.

    But with that versatility, comes a host of problems. If you’re facing knee pain it may be for any of the following reasons:

    InjuryYou may have a recent injury – perhaps a car accident or a fall. Or you may suffer from degeneration, the result of an injury many years ago. For example it’s common for soccer, football players, skiers or other young athletes to injure themselves in their teens or 20s, and not feel the true consequences until many years later.

    DiseaseThe main disease affecting the knee is arthritis. This disease often runs in families and can be made worse by injury or obesity. Nobody knows why some people get severe arthritis, while others don’t. Nobody knows why one knee in the same person gets arthritis, while the other does not. Arthritis may result in pain, swelling, stiffness or a feeling of looseness.

    AgeingThe surface of the knee is made up mainly of collagen, the primary protein building block of all animal tissues. Collagen is constantly being broken down and produced in the body. But as we age, the collagen tends to stiffen and become more brittle. Thus, it becomes damaged much more easily.

    Any of these problems may lead your doctor to suggest X-rays, meeting with an orthopedic surgeon, and, possibly, surgery.

  • I’ve been told I need surgery; why do I have to wait so long?

    Sometimes doctors will urge you to postpone surgery for as long as you can, because the benefits of the surgery may last for only 10 to 15 years and then need to be repeated.

    But if you are already in serious pain, the bigger issue is likely the waiting list typical in most Canadian provinces, including Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec. Hospital bed shortages and limited operating room times have left physicians and their patients equally frustrated. This is where Timely Medical Alternatives can help expedite your case in a private clinic or hospital so you can get the surgery you need, with no wait.

  • What if I need a knee replacement?

    Depending on your medical history, or following a diagnostic arthroscopy, your doctor may recommend arthroplasty. This is a full or partial replacement of the knee joint with an artificial prosthesis made of plastic or metal. Because it requires “open surgery” (not done with a scope), and a longer hospital stay, the typical wait period required by the Canadian public health care system may be longer than you’re prepared to tolerate.

    Again, this is where Timely Medical Alternatives has access to fully trained and certified orthopedic surgeons, can help expedite your treatment in a private clinic. The average knee implant restores about 100 degrees of movement (compared to a normal knee, which has about 130 to 140 degrees of movement).

  • How long will my recovery take and what will happen?

    Recovery time after surgery will vary, depending on what the surgeon does. Simple procedures such as removing torn cartilage via arthroscopy can have a recovery time of as little as two weeks. More complicated procedures, such as repairing damaged structures or replacing the knee (arthroplasty) can require four to six months of recovery.

    In any event, your orthopedic surgeon will prescribe pain medication for immediately following your surgery and probably suggest you keep your leg elevated and iced as much as possible for the first few days, to reduce swelling. You’ll also need to keep your dressing clean and dry. As well, you may be advised to begin by using crutches or a cane for getting around. Your surgeon can give you an estimate of anticipated recovery time at the time of your consultation.

    Doing exercises or taking physiotherapy will be very important after surgery so you can regain as much motion and strength as possible.

Hip

  • How quickly can you get me hip surgery?

    Typically, we can get you surgery within 2-3 weeks from the time we receive your diagnostic package.  In certain cases, we can get a client surgery within 24 hours.  Call or e-mail us to get a accurate quote and timeline for your surgery.

  • What are the benefits of hip surgery?

    Your hip is what is called a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” (called the femoral head) is covered by special surface – cartilage — which allows the joint to move smoothly and painlessly in its socket. But when the hip has been affected by injury or disease, the cartilage degenerates and the joint surfaces become rough, resulting in pain and stiffness.

    At first, the pain begins gradually and usually occurs only after higher levels of physical activity. With time, however, the pain increases and may be present even when you are at rest. Hip surgery can:

    -help eliminate this pain
    -improve your range of motion, and
    -minimize further wear and tear on the joint

  • I've been told I need hip surgery - why do I have to wait so long?

    Sometimes doctors will urge you to postpone surgery for as long as you can, because the benefits of the surgery may last for only 10 to 15 years and then need to be repeated.

    But if you are already in serious pain, the bigger issue is likely the waiting list typical in most Canadian provinces, including Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec. Hospital bed shortages and limited operating room times have left physicians and their patients equally frustrated. This is where Timely Medical Alternatives can help expedite your case through private clinics and hospitals so you can get the surgery you need, with no wait.

  • What's the difference between hip replacement and hip resurfacing?

    Total hip replacement surgery is most often recommended for people suffering from arthritis. It requires removing the top of the femur (thigh bone) and inserting a new metal stem into the bone shaft attached to a prosthetic ball joint. Sometimes, the surgeon will insert a new socket as well.

    Hip resurfacing, on the other hand, means that the femur is reshaped and resurfaced. As a result, the surgeon removes less bone – this option is only appropriate for those who have only mild joint degeneration.

  • What other issues do I need to consider?

    Hip surgery requires many decisions! The surgeon has two ways of fixing the joint – either with bone cement or by using a porous implant (without cement) designed to encourage the bone to regrow into the implant. There are also many choices for implant material – metal, ceramic and polyethylene.

    Technology is changing all the time – resulting in more hip surgery options than ever before. Your surgeon will be able to discuss all your choices with you, helping you make the best possible decision for you.

  • What happens after surgery?

    Usually, by the second day following your surgery, you will meet with a physiotherapist and or an occupational therapist who will help you get back on your feet and comfortable walking with a walker and or crutches. Your hospital stay is likely to be in the 4 to 6 days in length.

  • How long will it take me to recover from hip surgery?

    After you return home, you will need to use the crutches or a walker full-time for a period of time. In the short term, you will be instructed not to sit at a 90 degree angle, which means you will not be able to drive or sit up straight in a chair. You will also be asked to avoid crossing your legs, leaning forward, or twisting from the waist. Some special equipment will help make your recovery easier. This includes such items as a raised toilet seat, a stool for the shower, a reacher, which allows you to pick up things from the ground without bending, a sock cone, to help you put on socks and a long shoehorn.

    Approximately six weeks after your hip surgery, you will have a follow up visit with X-rays. At this point the doctor will likely allow you to begin increased weight bearing but you may still require a walking aid.

    At around the third or fourth month, the doctor will evaluate you again and likely permit further weight bearing. When you can return to work and resume recreational activities depends on your age, the type of hip surgery, the kinds of activity you want to undertake and your recovery rate.

    Your surgeon can give you a better estimate of anticipated recovery time at the time of your consultation.

Other

  • How quickly can you get me surgery?

    Typically, we can get you surgery within 2-3 weeks from the time we receive your diagnostic package.  In certain cases, we can get a client surgery within 24 hours.  Call or e-mail us to get a accurate quote and timeline for your surgery.

  • What can I do about my hand/foot/ankle pain?

    If you have serious hand, foot or ankle pain and conservative treatments such as rest, medication, physiotherapy and braces are not appropriate or have not worked, it may be time to consider surgery. The following problems can often be successfully treated by surgery:

    -Hand problems: Carpal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow, arthritis,
    -Dupuytren’s contracture, wrist pain or injuries.
    -Foot problems: Hammertoes or bone spurs.
    -Ankle problems: Arthritis or fractures

  • Why do I have to wait so long for my hand, foot, or ankle surgery?

    In most cases, unless you’ve suffered a serious trauma, hand, foot or ankle surgery will be seen as “elective.” As a result of rationing of care by the Canadian public health system and limited operating room times for surgeons, your surgery may be delayed and will be subject to being cancelled. Timely Medical Alternatives can help you find a private clinic to expedite your case so you can get the surgery you need as quickly as possible.

  • What kinds of surgery are available?

    Hand surgeryIf you’ve suffered an injury, surgeons can use such techniques as grafting, flap surgery, replantation or transplants to repair injuries. Similar techniques can be used to help people who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis regain movement by removing inflamed tissue and, sometimes, implanting artificial joints. Surgery can treat Dupuytren’s Contracture by cutting and separating the bands of thickened tissue, freeing the tendons and allowing the fingers to move.

    FootWe can facilitate surgery for hammertoes and bone spurs within the Canadian private medical system.

    AnkleIf the cartilage in your ankle has been damaged by arthritis or an injury, you may require an ankle replacement, ankle fusion (traditional or TTC or tibiotalocalcaneal) or ankle reconstruction. Ankle replacement surgery is a good option if you don’t participate in sports such as skiing, basketball and football.

  • How long will it take me to recover from hand, foot, or ankle surgery?

    Recovery time will depend on your medical condition and the nature of your surgery. If you do not require a general anesthetic, you may only need day surgery and may not require staying in hospital overnight. Surgeries requiring a general anesthetic or complex surgeries are more likely to require a hospital stay. Total recovery time can range from a few weeks to many months, depending on the nature of your surgery and your typical activity level or the work that you do.